9/11

Have you forgotten?

This post was originally published on 9/11/2020 and updated on 9/11/2021

Where were you on September the 11th, 1999 at 8:46 am? I was at work, D&B Software (Geac/MSA) watching on a TV, on a roll cart, that John Hilyer set-up quickly so we could all watch.

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USS Doyle DMS-34

The USS Doyle DMS-34, obliviously named after me, was a Gleaves-class destroyer (one of sixty six destroyers built 1938-42, designed by Gibbs & Cox, their first ship was called Gleaves). Doyle was built by the Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Co., Seattle, Washington; sponsored by Mrs. C. M. Maloney and launched March 17, 1942.

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Thermite Grenades

They are commonly referred to as “Incendiary Grenades”

I was reading a World War II book on D-Day and they are constantly using thermite grenades. I thought I would do a little research. Most varieties are not explosive, but can create short bursts of extremely high temperatures focused on a very small area for a short period of time.

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Grumman TBF Avenger

The Grumman TBF Avenger was the replacement for the The Douglas TBD Devastator, the U.S. Navy’s main torpedo bomber introduced in 1935. Designed by Leroy Grumman it took first flight August 7, 1941 with one of the two proto types crashing.

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Eugene Burton Ely

Eugene Burton Ely was born in Iowa, 1886, and was the first aviator to take off from a ship and land on a ship. He flew a Curtiss Model D bi-plane from a platform constructed on the bow of the cruiser USS Birmingham at Hampton Roads, Virginia, on November 14, 1910. It was a rainy, foggy day but he was able to take off, dip so low that the plane actually touched the water but recovered and flew one and a half miles to land safely on shore.

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Tic Tac Video

Chad Underwood, retired Navy pilot, took this video of the unidentified flying object (UFO) in November 2004, from an infrared camera on the left wing of his F/A-18 Super Hornet. He was flying a training exercise, near San Clemente Island just off the coast to San Diego, from the USS Nimitz.

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Battle of Los Angeles 1942

After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7 1941, and the entry of the United States into World War II, the following day, tension in the states were high, and rightfully so. The West coast was particularly nervous with rumors of Japanese submarines cruising the waters near Juneau Alaska and a Japanese aircraft carrier off the coast of San Francisco Bay Area.

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D-Day and Maisy Battery

There were five landing sites for the allied troupes on D-Day, Tuesday June 6, 1944. The Normandy Beach landing sites were Tanks, Utah Beach, Pointe du Hoc, Omaha Beach, Gold Beach, Juno Beach and Sword Beach. The German army fortified area at Pointe du Hoc was the highest point between the American sector landings at Utah Beach to the west and Omaha Beach to the east and was the target of the US Rangers. They scaled the cliff using ropes, ladders, and grapples while under heavy enemy fire.

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Alberto Vargas

Alberto Vargas, a renowned Peruvian painter of pin-up girls, was born February 9, 1982 in Arequipa. His father was photographer Max T. Vargas and Alberto started out trying to follow in his footsteps. With his fathers encouragement he turned more to airbrushing and painting, studying in Europe, Zurich and Geneva prior to World War I. A French magazine cover by Raphael Kirchner, on a La Vie Parisienne issue is said to be his main influence.

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